AHMAD 23 years old ( Forced Displacement )

AHMAD:
My father is a farmer. He has a land in Bayt Sawa. The attack started with intense uninterrupted shelling, and other things, that we have never imagined, started with it, such as the Regime’s access to al #Ghouta. The Regime started to enter from Bayt Sawa side. My father was stuck in the land and was hiding from the intense shelling. We could not communicate with him nor knew what happened with him. When we met, he told us how he was hiding with our neighbor in a ground hole the latter made. When the shelling became less, they came out of the hole and saw that the Regime soldiers were close so they ran away through the lands and headed to Hamoriyah. My father told us that we needed to leave Hamoriyah because the army was at Bayt Sawa. We could not go to Arbin because the road was very difficult, especially with the lack of transportation and the intense shelling. There were rumors that people can go collectively to the Regime areas to survive shelling, starvation, fear and insecurity. I decided to convince my parents to go with those people and I head to Arbin. I took heart and suggested this but everyone objected the idea and I went silent. The bombardments got stronger and the Regime was proceeding and finding a solution was a must, especially with the panic I saw on my siblings that made them weaker and I was unable to do anything about it. I was unable to bring them food too so the only solution was to convince my parents again to go with the others. After long arguments accompanied with the sounds of shelling and close clashes, we decided I go to Arbin and my family to the Regime areas. It was a very difficult decision but there was no other option.
My father is a farmer. He has a land in Bayt Sawa. The attack started with intense uninterrupted shelling, and other things, that we have never imagined, started with it, such as the Regime’s access to al Ghouta. The Regime started to enter from Bayt Sawa side. My father was stuck in the land and was hiding from the intense shelling. We could not communicate with him nor knew what happened with him. When we met, he told us how he was hiding with our neighbor in a ground hole the latter made. When the shelling became less, they came out of the hole and saw that the Regime soldiers were close so they ran away through the lands and headed to Hamoriyah. My father told us that we needed to leave Hamoriyah because the army was at Bayt Sawa. We could not go to Arbin because the road was very difficult, especially with the lack of transportation and the intense shelling. There were rumors that people can go collectively to the Regime areas to survive shelling, starvation, fear and insecurity. I decided to convince my parents to go with those people and I head to Arbin. I took heart and suggested this but everyone objected the idea and I went silent. The bombardments got stronger and the Regime was proceeding and finding a solution was a must, especially with the panic I saw on my siblings that made them weaker and I was unable to do anything about it. I was unable to bring them food too so the only solution was to convince my parents again to go with the others. After long arguments accompanied with the sounds of shelling and close clashes, we decided I go to Arbin and my family to the Regime areas. It was a very difficult decision but there was no other option.
The new trip started. I ran away to Arbin under the shelling and did not hear about my family. I stayed in a basement in Arbin with my friends waiting for our destiny until an agreement on our exit to the North took place. The agreement allowed those who did not want to leave to stay and I first decided to stay to see my family. The green buses came and the people started leaving in the first day, then in the second, then in the third. No one stayed, everyone wanted to leave, especially with the news that came from Kafr Batna on arresting the young people who stayed and conducting field executions. I reconsidered and decided to go to the North with the others. Of course, I could not contact my family or know their situation but I heard from our neighbor that they were in the shelter.
Finally, I have settled down in a house until today. I did not have a choice but to start working. With the money I had, I was able to open a small vegetable stall only. I’m saving now to make my business bigger and open a supermarket to send money to my family after I knew that they are fine in our relatives’ house in Damascus.
Nothing is harder than separation but I thought if I kept thinking this way, I would be exhausted. I started convincing myself that nothing happened and this is only a normal travel and one day I will meet my family again and see our house and neighborhood again.
Every day, when I sleep, I see the photos of my siblings, mother and father and I cry deeply. I see the photos of my martyred friends, our neighborhood and the streets of Hamoriyah and feel smothered but then I wipe my tears and sleep hoping that may something happen in the morning and lead me to my family, house and neighbors.
#ForcedDisplacement